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Bacteria May Be Cause of Common Incontinence

Urinary incontinence in women is often attributed to childbirth or pregnancy and sometimes even just the simple aging process. Researchers at the Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine found that the bacteria in healthy women’s bladders were different in women with a specific, and common, form of urinary incontinence. They published their findings in July in the American Society for Microbiology’s online journal called mBio.

According to the report, urgency urinary incontinence (UUI), which affects around 15 percent of women, may be due to a bacteria, researchers believe. For around half of the women who are diagnosed UUI, traditional treatments do not work.

The researchers collected catheter urine samples from 90 women, some of which had UUI, and analyzed the bacterial content using the expanded quantitative urine culture technique. This allowed the researchers to isolate bacteria not normally found in a standard urine culture. This may be the reason why these women failed to respond to antispasmodic treatment and a seemingly clear urine initially.

To see more research findings, visit Dr. Vorstman athttp://www.urologyweb.com/exclusive-medical-reports/

Dr. Vorstman also blogs at http://www.urologyweb.com/uro-health-blog/

Contact him directly at bvorstmanmd@gmail.com.

 

Posted in: Womens Health

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Study Finds Reduced Deaths from PSA Screening, But Recommendation Is Surprising

Routine PSA screening programs of prostate cancer detection have been a source of debate for many years. While some argue that these screenings help reduce mortality rates, others warn that the negatives of treating men who do not need to be treated due to their PSA alone can outweigh the potential for reduced deaths. A recently published long-term study of over 162,000 men in Europe addressed this issue again.

The study, which began in 1993, was named the European Randomised Study of Screening for Prostate Cancer. Its goal was to decide whether screening men for PSA levels would, in fact, reduce deaths from prostate cancer. Following men between the ages of 50 and 74 from eight countries, the study randomized the group to give PSA screenings at regular intervals, or give no screenings at all for a control. If the PSA levels were higher than 3.0 ng/ml, then the men received biopsies.

The results, which were recently published, showed that screening may cut prostate cancer deaths by 15 percent in the first 9 years of screening. For the first 11 years, the rate increased to 22 percent. After 13 years, no further improvement was seen. Overall, the rate of death dropped by a fifth in the screening group compared to the control.

The truth is that the number of men that had to receive the screening and risky evaluation in order to save just one life was substantial. Furthermore, much of the improved survival was not from any cancer treatment but because of additional advanced medical therapies. Furthermore, there was liberal use of the all-inclusive prostate cancer label and we know now that the very common Gleason 6 (3+3) prostate “cancer” has none of the hallmarks of a cancer and behaves as noncancerous. Therefore, men being treated for the Gleason 6 disease are exposed to many significant complications but for zero benefit.

In conclusion, the researchers suggested offering men balanced information about the dangers of prostate cancer over-diagnosis and over-treatment and the options for screening.

To learn more about his thoughts on the over-diagnosis of prostate cancer, visit Dr. Bert Vorstman at http://www.urologyweb.com/exclusive-medical-reports/

Dr. Vorstman also blogs at http://www.urologyweb.com/uro-health-blog/

Contact him directly at bvorstmanmd@gmail.com.

Posted in: General Healthcare

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Genetics, Family History Play Role in Early Onset, Aggressive Prostate Cancer

Studies from the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center suggest that more younger men may be being diagnosed with the uncommon aggressive form of prostate cancer.

The most common age for prostate cancer occurrence is between the ages of 60 and 90. Most of these so-called prostate cancers detected are the Gleason 6 (3+3) “cancers” and on both clinical and molecular biology grounds, these have none of the hallmarks of a real cancer. In fact, the very common Gleason 6 prostate “cancer” behaves as noncancerous and is not a health-risk.

The University of Michigan researchers data however, suggested that younger patients with prostate cancer may be more likely to experience the uncommon aggressive form of prostate cancer. This particular form of prostate cancer demands attention and treatment but not through robotic prostatectomy.

In part, these aggressive forms of prostate cancer may be more advanced at presentation as younger men are not routinely screened for prostate cancer.

Family history may play a role. Researchers have found that men with a family history of prostate cancer have a two- to three-times greater chance of being diagnosed with prostate cancer. The more relatives who have the disease, the greater the risk is. However, only the uncommon high-grade disease is potentially lethal.

If you have a family history of prostate cancer, it is important to empower yourself. Dr. Bert Vorstman offers the latest information about prostate cancer and prostate cancer treatments at at http://www.urologyweb.com/exclusive-medical-reports/. Dr. Vorstman also blogs at http://www.urologyweb.com/uro-health-blog/

Contact him directly at bvorstmanmd@gmail.com.

 

Posted in: General Healthcare

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Certain Bladder Cancer Patients May Be Able to Get Greater Results with Additional Treatment

Muscle-invasive bladder cancer is a difficult cancer to treat with a high mortality rate. A recent study published in the British Journal of Cancer indicates an option that may help doctors achieve better treatment with radiotherapy.

The study, which was funded by the Medical Research Council and performed by a team at the University of Manchester, found that certain bladder cancer patients were more likely to benefit from an additional treatment alongside radiotherapy. These patients had tumors with high levels of the HIF-1α protein, and they saw a greater benefit when carbogen, a carbon dioxide and oxygen mix, and nicotinamide were given in conjunction with radiotherapy. This treatment was called CON.

The study looked at the protein levels in 137 different patients, some of which had radiotherapy alone and some of which had radiotherapy with the additional CON treatment. The study found that the levels of the protein could predict which patients were going to benefit most from CON. Patients with high levels of the specific protein were able to better survive the disease after radiotherapy with CON. However, patients with low levels of the protein did not have a benefit with the addition of CON.

This is an important biomarker that doctors may be able to use to create the most effective treatment for patients diagnosed with muscle-invasive bladder cancer. For those with high levels of the HIF-1α protein, this information can lead to effective treatment and a lower risk of mortality. Further study is needed into treatments that will work for patients who are not in this group.

Muscle-invasive bladder cancer requires multi-modality treatment.

For more information about various urological conditions, visit Dr. Bert Vorstman at http://www.urologyweb.com/exclusive-medical-reports/

Dr. Vorstman also blogs at http://www.urologyweb.com/uro-health-blog/

Contact him directly at bvorstmanmd@gmail.com.

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Doctors Pushing for 15-Year Followup for Prostate Cancer Patients

For many cancer patients, surviving 10 years past cancer treatment is a cause for celebration, as they can be declared cancer-free. Yet prostate cancer is one form of cancer that has a higher risk of late recurrence or a recurrence occurring 10 to 15 years after a perceived successful treatment. Because of this risk of late recurrence, the American Urological Association recommends a 15-year follow-up after prostate cancer treatment.

Research presented at the 2014 meeting of the American Urological Association pointed to the need for this follow-up treatment. Researchers, led by Frank Critz, MD, of Radiotherapy Clinics of Georgia, attempted to determine how long treatment follow-up should occur. They found that a minimum of 15 years wasnecessary.

The treatment followed 2,808 prostate cancer patients from 1984 to 2002. The men were treated by radiotherapy and were declared disease free at their 10-year follow up. Of these men, 48 ended up with a late recurrence of the disease. The median time frame for the late recurrence was 12 years after treatment. The men had a medium time from the follow up to the recurrence of three years.

In addition, four of the patients had a PSA of less than 0.2 ng/ml at their 15-year follow-up, but went on to have their disease recur some 15-20 years after treatment. One of the men died after 25 years because of metastatic prostate cancer. The total recurrence rate was 3 percent at 15 years and 5 percent at 20 years. None of the patients had recurrence at 10 years, which is a common time span for being considered “cured”.

Prostate cancer is one from of cancer that is often misunderstood.

To learn more about prostate cancer and the best treatment options available, visit Dr. Bert Vorstman at http://www.urologyweb.com/exclusive-medical-reports/ Dr. Vorstman also blogs at http://www.urologyweb.com/uro-health-blog/

Contact him directly at bvorstmanmd@gmail.com.

Posted in: Mens Health, Prostate Cancer News

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Obesity Linked to Higher Survival Rate for Radical Cystectomy

Patients who undergo a radical cystectomy as treatment for bladder cancer have an improved survival rate if they are obese, a recently reported finding shows. The findings were reported at the American Urological Association’s 2014 annual meeting and showed that, for muscle-invasive bladder cancer, obesity is actually a benefit in treatment outcomes.

The study followed 728 patients retrospectively. The median age of the patients was 70 years old, and all had received a radical cystectomy to treat bladder cancer. The overall survival rate for those with a BMI of 30 kg/m2 was higher than that for those who were not obese. In the study, the average survival rate for obese patients was 4.6 years, compared to 2.7 years for non-obese patients.  In total after necessary adjustments, obese patients were shown to have a 40 percent lower risk of death compared to their non-obese counterparts.

This is not the first time that obesity has been linked to higher survival rates for cancer patients. The same link has been seen in esophageal and lung cancers. Obesity did affect the treatment in other ways as well. Obese patients had a longer surgery time and lost more blood than non-obese patients. They did not, however, require more blood transfusions as a result.

Obesity is just one of several factors that affect the outcome for a patient dealing with urologic cancers.

To learn more about treatment methods for common urological conditions and especially for localized prostate cancer, visit Dr. Bert Vorstman athttp://www.urologyweb.com/exclusive-medical-reports/

Dr. Vorstman also blogs at http://www.urologyweb.com/uro-health-blog/

Contact him directly at bvorstmanmd@gmail.com.

Posted in: Mens Health

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HIFU for Prostate Cancer Treatment Shows Promise in Preserving Erectile Function

For men who have prostate cancer, the treatments often carry side effects that are worse than the disease itself. Erectile dysfunction is one of these. This problem was the subject of a study performed by British researchers at the London NHS Trust, and the research was reported at the American Urological Association 2014 annual meeting.

According to the report, men who have high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment for prostate cancer do often experience a postoperative decline in erectile function. However, unlike other treatment options, HIFU does not appear to create a permanent problem. Most men have their erectile function return to their baseline level in around six months.

The researchers studied 116 patients who received HIFU treatment. They established a baseline erectile function score of 19.8. The men studied showed a significant decline in erectile health at one month, with a level of 12.5 being average. At three months this had increased to 15.7, and by six months it was as high as the baseline. The study also showed that 65 percent of patients were potent without medication after receiving HIFU.

What does this mean for prostate cancer patients? It means that prostate cancer has a new treatment option that may eliminate the risks, including the risk of erectile dysfunction.

Of course, prostate cancer does not always need to be treated, and in many cases is not a true cancer at all. To learn more about the potential dangers of prostate cancer treatment, visit Dr. Bert Vorstman athttp://www.urologyweb.com/exclusive-medical-reports/

Dr. Vorstman also blogs at http://www.urologyweb.com/uro-health-blog/

Contact him directly at bvorstmanmd@gmail.com.

Posted in: Prostate Cancer News

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Waiting Before Starting Hormone Therapy May Be Best Option for Prostate Cancer Recurrence

Do men who are showing signs of a prostate cancer relapse need to start hormone therapy immediately? New research from the American Society of Clinical Oncology says no. Dr. Clifford A. Hudis, president of the Society, has produced a study that shows that starting hormone therapy at the first sign of relapse may not be the best option.

The study was released in a telephone news conference in advance of the American Society of Clinical Oncology’s summer meeting. In the study, men who had undergone either radiation therapy or surgery for prostate cancer, then had a rise in PSA levels after treatment, were studied. These patients had no other signs of prostate cancer problems other than PSA level increases, and this is a situation affecting around 60,000 men a year.

In a typical course of treatment, men in this situation would be given hormone therapy to block the development of testosterone and, in theory, stop the growth of the prostate cancer tumor. However, this creates unwanted side effects, including hot flashes, muscle weakness, osteoporosis, cardiac issues and problems with sex drive.

The study followed around 2,000 men with these PSA relapses, some of which chose immediate hormone therapy and some of which chose to wait until they had other signs of relapse. The 5- and 10-year overall survival rates or death rates showed no true difference. While the study was not randomized, it does point to a significant fact. Waiting to deliver hormone treatment after a relapse based on PSA alone can help preserve quality of life without harming the patient’s overall outcome. Doctors and patients need to weigh all of their options when choosing the best solution for treating their prostate cancers.

Prostate cancer is one of the most misunderstood diseases the modern man can face. To learn more about treatment options, and why waiting is often the best course of treatment, visit Dr. Bert Vorstman athttp://www.urologyweb.com/exclusive-medical-reports/

Dr. Vorstman also blogs at http://www.urologyweb.com/uro-health-blog/

Contact him directly at bvorstmanmd@gmail.com.

Posted in: Prostate Cancer News

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Shedding New Light on Bladder Cancer

Bert Vorstman MD, MS, FAAP, FRACS, FACS

www.urologyweb.com

For patients with localized high-risk bladder cancer, ta new blue light technology is available.

Using the new blue light technology, doctors are able to make cancer cells in the bladder light up and glow in a color different than the surrounding tissue. This process is similar to the way a blue light exposes blood or other bodily fluids at a crime scene. This technique can help doctors target treatment more effectively and successfully.

Once the blue light has highlighted the bladder cancer, the area is then treated.Furthermore, the light allows for the area to be checked after treatment to ensure that all of the cells have been destroyed, lessening the chance of recurrence.

For many patients, bladder cancer symptoms can, at times, mirror those of a urinary tract infection. For example,

> Visible blood in the urine

> Urgency to urinate

> Burning on urination

Patients experiencing these voiding symptoms should seek the help of a urologist to rule out bladder cancer.

To learn more about recent advances in the field of urology, visit

Dr. Bert Vorstman at http://www.urologyweb.com/exclusive-medical-reports/

Dr. Vorstman also blogs at http://www.urologyweb.com/uro-health-blog/ andhttp://www.hifurx.com/blog

Contact him directly at bvorstmanmd@gmail.com.

 

Posted in: Mens Health

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